The story behind the leo: UCLA Gymnastics debuts the ‘Pauley’ leotard

By Karyssa D'Agostino | February 8, 2023
UCLA's Margzetta Frazier and Emily Lee wearing the "Pauley" leotard during the Bruins' away meet at Utah on February 3, 2023.
UCLA's Margzetta Frazier and Emily Lee wearing the "Pauley" leotard during the Bruins' away meet at Utah on February 3, 2023. (© Liza David, UCLA Associate Athletic Director)

Every week this season Gymnastics Now will be highlighting one NCAA team’s competition leotard and sharing the story behind the design and creation of the garment.

This week’s pick: UCLA debuts the Pauley leo

The UCLA Bruins were stunning in their new competition leotards which they debuted during their Pac-12 away meet against the Utah Utes in the Jon M. Huntsman Center.

While the team was on the road for the top 5 matchup, the custom Sylvia P designed, open back leotard instilled in the athletes a sense of home – UCLA’s “home” being the electric Pauley Pavilion back in Los Angeles.

UCLA Head Coach Janelle McDonald shared the story behind the leo with Gymnastics Now:

“The vision for this leotard was to create one that had a classic streamline look that sparkled with a vibrant elegance and edge. The body of the leotard shows enhanced texture and dimension with the classic UCLA script logo on the front and a sublimated watercolor fade of navy to cobalt blue. The crystals on the sleeves are the striking feature of this design and are highlighted by golden shadow premium crystals in varied sizes.

It is named after our historic Pauley Pavilion, where we compete on the UCLA campus. The classic streamline feel showcases the rich history and excellence of Pauley Pavilion, while the edgy and chic crystal design represents both our team’s performance under the bright lights and the incredible energy that competing in Pauley creates!”

Janelle McDonald

UCLA Gymnastics Head Coach

Bruin freshman Selena Harris showed off the uniform’s stunning details on Friday as she broke it down to Bad Bunny and tumbled her way to a 9.900 on floor.

Originally tweeted by UCLA Gymnastics (@uclagymnastics) on February 6, 2023.